About Livesay & Myers, P.C.

Livesay & Myers, P.C. is a law firm with offices in Fairfax, Arlington, Leesburg, Manassas and Fredericksburg, Virginia.

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Virginia Poised to Update Child Support Guidelines

Posted on March 27th, 2014, by Livesay & Myers, P.C. in Family Law. Comments Off on Virginia Poised to Update Child Support Guidelines

The Virginia General Assembly recently passed a bill to update Virginia’s child support guidelines. The bill, HB 933, enjoyed significant support in the legislature—passing the House of Delegates on a vote of 85-10 and the Senate on a 38-0 vote. If the Governor now signs the bill, it will go into law effective July 1, 2014.

HB 933 proposes three significant changes to Virginia Code § 20-108.2:

Updated Child Support Guidelines. Virginia initially adopted the child support guidelines set forth in Virginia Code Section 20-108.2 in 1988, and while it has made minor changes to portions of this law it has not updated the actual guidelines in the past 26 years. The new law would not simply increase child support amounts across the board; rather, the specific details of an individual’s case could result in higher or lower child support amounts under the revised guidelines.
Removes Set … Read More »


Transfer of Post-9/11 GI Bill Benefits in Divorce

Posted on March 6th, 2014, by Livesay & Myers, P.C. in Divorce, Family Law, Military Divorce. Comments Off on Transfer of Post-9/11 GI Bill Benefits in Divorce

Military divorce cases often involve discussion of military retired pay, the Survivor Benefit Plan, and continuation of the spouse’s medical benefits after divorce. A growing topic of discussion in these cases is the servicemember’s education benefits under the Post-9/11 GI Bill. Increasingly, these benefits are becoming a topic of negotiation in separation agreements between divorcing couples.

The GI Bill can cover all in-state tuition and fees at public degree-granting schools. It also provides for a housing stipend and book allowance while in school. The benefits may be used up to 15 years after the servicemember’s discharge from active duty. Eligibility for Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits requires a minimum of six years of service. Separate requirements apply for reservists. Servicemembers may transfer their Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits to a spouse or child, but only after meeting an additional service obligation of four years.

Under 38 U.S.C. § 3020(f)(3), Post-9/11 … Read More »


New Guidance for Continuing Child Support for Disabled Children

Posted on January 17th, 2014, by Livesay & Myers, P.C. in Family Law. Comments Off on New Guidance for Continuing Child Support for Disabled Children

On January 14, 2014, in the published opinion of Mayer v. Mayer, the Virginia Court of Appeals provided some much-needed guidance regarding continued child support for disabled children under Virginia law. Per Virginia Code § 20-124.2 a parent may petition and the court may grant the continuation of support for any child over the age of 18 who is (a) severely and permanently mentally or physically disabled, (b) unable to live independently and support himself, and (c) resides in the home of the parent seeking or receiving child support. However, there has been no bright-line rule as to whether the petition for continued support has to be filed before the child is emancipated in order for the court to consider it, or whether it can be filed after emancipation. The Court of Appeals in Mayer greatly clarified Virginia law in this area, by ruling that (1) … Read More »


Virginia Legislature Considers Streamlined Custody Procedures

Posted on January 16th, 2014, by Livesay & Myers, P.C. in Custody, Family Law. Comments Off on Virginia Legislature Considers Streamlined Custody Procedures

Modification to Virginia Code Would Allow Consolidated Petitions

The issues of child custody and visitation are about as connected as any two issues can be. If you have any experience with Virginia custody cases, however, you know that it can feel like each part of your case has its own case number. And that’s because, by and large, it does! The Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Courts here in Virginia will assign one identification number for a child custody case and give a second, different number to a visitation case… for the same child. If paternity is an issue that becomes a third case number. And if there are multiple children, well, each child gets his or her own set of unique case numbers for his or her custody matter. Parents in a custody dispute can find themselves with more than … Read More »


Five Tips For Getting the Most From Your Family Law Attorney

Posted on December 19th, 2013, by Livesay & Myers, P.C. in Custody, Divorce, Family Law. Comments Off on Five Tips For Getting the Most From Your Family Law Attorney

If you are going through a divorce or other family law case, it is advisable to hire an experienced family law attorney as early in the process as possible. Not only will your attorney help guide you through the process, he or she will also serve as your advocate and voice so that you can get the best possible result without having to stand alone. It is no secret, however, that legal fees in a family law case can be expensive—and you want to receive value for your money. Here are five tips for getting the most from the relationship with your family law attorney:

Pick wisely. Not all attorneys are created equal. Make sure you feel comfortable with your attorney’s personality, level of professionalism, and views about your case. Feel free to seek a second opinion with another attorney so that you … Read More »


Servicemembers Civil Relief Act Does Not Preclude All Civil Actions

Posted on November 25th, 2013, by Livesay & Myers, P.C. in Military Divorce. Comments Off on Servicemembers Civil Relief Act Does Not Preclude All Civil Actions

As we have previously discussed here at the Livesay Myers Blog, the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA) can have a significant impact in a family law case where one party is a member of the Armed Forces. The SCRA provides paths for servicemembers on active duty to delay litigation in which they are involved. Key points that servicemembers often ignore with respect to the SCRA are (a) that it only provides a temporary delay to their litigation and (b) that the servicemember is required to actively seek relief under the SCRA.

These points were discussed in a recent Marine Corps Times article regarding a soldier who appealed a child support court order to the Alaska Supreme Court. The soldier argued in his appeal that the SCRA protected him from any negative consequences of civil litigation as long as he is on active … Read More »


Child Support For Children With Autism In Virginia

Posted on October 28th, 2013, by Livesay & Myers, P.C. in Family Law. Comments Off on Child Support For Children With Autism In Virginia

For single parents of children with autism or other special needs, navigating the issue of child support can be a confusing and anxiety-ridden process. These parents may require more child support than is called for by the statewide guidelines in Virginia, and may require child support well past the time child support usually ends. A proper understanding of several points of Virginia law can greatly assist these parents in meeting the special needs of their children.

Deviation From Guidelines

The starting point for determining child support in all Virginia cases is Virginia Code § 20-108.2, which sets forth our statewide child support guidelines. The guidelines provide a child support amount based on the incomes of the parties and any costs incurred for health care coverage and work-related child care. While such a straightforward formula may be appropriate under ordinary circumstances, custodial parents of autistic children may … Read More »


Can Pre-Marital Conduct Be a Ground for Divorce in Virginia?

Posted on October 14th, 2013, by Livesay & Myers, P.C. in Divorce. Comments Off on Can Pre-Marital Conduct Be a Ground for Divorce in Virginia?

In a case recently reviewed by the Virginia Court of Appeals, a wife sought appeal of her divorce case because the judge refused to grant a fault-based divorce on the ground of pre-marital cruelty. The trial court in her case instead entered the divorce based on the parties’ living separately, and the Court of Appeals decided there was no error in so doing. In Virginia, if more than one ground for divorce exists, the trial judge has discretion to enter the divorce on any applicable ground. The Court of Appeals, relying on this rule, held that even if the wife had proved pre-marital cruelty, the trial judge acted properly in choosing to grant the divorce on the no-fault ground of the parties’ separation.

In the course of reaching its decision, the Court of Appeals “assum[ed] without deciding” that pre-marital cruelty is a valid ground for divorce in … Read More »


What Does It Mean To Dissipate Or Waste Marital Assets?

Posted on September 19th, 2013, by Livesay & Myers, P.C. in Divorce, Family Law. Comments Off on What Does It Mean To Dissipate Or Waste Marital Assets?

If you are involved in a contested divorce in the Commonwealth of Virginia, the court will eventually set a date for an equitable distribution trial. At that trial, you and your spouse will have the opportunity to present proposals to the court for distribution of the marital property and debts. Occasionally, one party in an equitable distribution hearing will allege that the other has misused or deliberately disposed of marital property to purposefully deprive the other party of his or her share. This behavior is commonly known as “marital waste” or “dissipation of assets,” and the court has authority to consider such behavior in making an equitable distribution award.

But how does the court know when marital waste was purposeful?  The general rule in Virginia, stated in Booth v. Booth, 7 Va. App. 22, 371 S.E.2d 569 (1988), is that “waste may be … Read More »


Stafford County Pendente Lite Hearings: Mediation Orientation

Posted on September 4th, 2013, by Livesay & Myers, P.C. in Divorce, Family Law. Comments Off on Stafford County Pendente Lite Hearings: Mediation Orientation

A key step in every contested divorce case in Virginia is the pendente lite hearing, where the court puts in place a number of ground rules to govern the parties until the divorce is final. “Pendente lite” is a Latin term which essentially means “pending the litigation” or in this context, “pending the final divorce.” In many cases these pendente lite ground rules include an order for temporary child and spousal support.

Each county has their own set of procedures regarding these hearings. For example, pendente lite hearings in Fairfax follow a very rigid structure, including a strictly-enforced 30 minute time limit. Stafford County also follows a schedule with most all hearings being 30 minutes, but Stafford is unique in its near universal drive to have parties attempt mediation before their temporary hearings.

The Virginia Code authorizes courts to refer any contested civil matter (such as a divorce … Read More »


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