About Livesay & Myers, P.C.

Livesay & Myers, P.C. is a law firm with offices in Fairfax, Arlington, Leesburg, Manassas and Fredericksburg, Virginia.

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L&M Congratulates 2020 Super Lawyers & Rising Stars

Posted on April 17th, 2020, by Livesay & Myers, P.C. in Uncategorized. No Comments

Livesay & Myers, P.C. proudly announces that 13 of our attorneys have been named 2020 Super Lawyers or Super Lawyers Rising Stars.

Super Lawyers selects attorneys using a patented multiphase selection process. Peer nominations and evaluations are combined with independent research. Each candidate is evaluated on 12 indicators of peer recognition and professional achievement. Selections are made on an annual, state-by-state basis. The result is an objective, comprehensive listing of the top lawyers in each state.

The selection process for the Rising Stars list is the same as the Super Lawyers selection process, with one exception: to be eligible for inclusion in Rising Stars, a candidate must be either 40 years old or younger or in practice for 10 years or less.

Every year, no more than 5% of the lawyers in each state are named Super Lawyers, and no more than 2.5% … Read More »


Marriage Story: Four Lessons for Your Virginia Divorce

Posted on March 23rd, 2020, by Livesay & Myers, P.C. in Custody, Divorce, Family Law. No Comments

Marriage Story was released on Netflix in late 2019 to tremendous critical acclaim. The beautifully heartfelt film depicts the devastating unraveling of the marriage of two people, portrayed by Scarlett Johansson and Adam Driver. Marriage Story artfully captures the emotional turmoil faced by many people after they make the decision to pursue a divorce.

If you are a Virginia resident facing a divorce, not everything you see in Marriage Story will apply to your own case. The film gets some details right, but other things that happen in the film are legally questionable, or at least would not apply to a case in Virginia. But, we can identify four lessons from Marriage Story that you can apply to your Virginia divorce.

Interstate Custody Jurisdiction

One legal detail that Marriage Story seems to get wrong relates to interstate custody jurisdiction. The child custody battle in … Read More »


Adultery and the Fifth Amendment in Virginia Divorce Cases

Posted on September 13th, 2019, by Livesay & Myers, P.C. in Divorce, Family Law. No Comments

Under Virginia law, cheating on a spouse is illegal. In Virginia, any married person who voluntarily has sexual intercourse with a person who is not his or her spouse is guilty of adultery, which is punishable as a Class 4 misdemeanor. The maximum criminal penalty for adultery is a $250 fine, but the ramifications in a divorce action may be much more severe. Adultery can be used as a fault ground to obtain a divorce, may be a bar to spousal support and can be considered regarding child custody and equitable distribution of marital property.

Even so, what happens when a cheating spouse invokes his or her Fifth Amendment privilege against self-incrimination? In Virginia, a party can exercise his or her constitutional privilege against self-incrimination in both criminal and civil actions. Depending on the circumstances of the case, a cheating spouse’s … Read More »


Registering a Foreign Custody Order in Virginia

Posted on February 11th, 2019, by Livesay & Myers, P.C. in Custody, Family Law. Comments Off on Registering a Foreign Custody Order in Virginia

What happens to a custody order when you move from one state to another with your child(ren)? If you have moved from another state to Virginia and have a child custody order signed by a judge in your former state, you will probably want to register that order for enforcement in Virginia courts.

The Uniform Child Custody Jurisdiction and Enforcement Act (UCCJEA) provides that one state court will recognize the custody order of another state court if the order has been properly registered. The Commonwealth of Virginia has adopted UCCJEA provisions into the Virginia Code. As set forth in Virginia Code § 20-146.24, a court of the Commonwealth has a duty to enforce a child custody determination of a court of another state if either the “latter court exercised jurisdiction in substantial conformity with the UCCJEA,” or “the determination was made under … Read More »


Common Myths of Family Law in Virginia

Posted on August 12th, 2018, by Livesay & Myers, P.C. in Family Law. Comments Off on Common Myths of Family Law in Virginia

Family law encompasses many issues affecting families, including but not limited to divorce, child custody and visitation, child and spousal support, protective orders, pre/post-nuptial agreements and equitable distribution. With so much information on the internet, it may be difficult to get accurate answers about certain issues. Below, we debunk four common myths of family law in Virginia.

Myth #1: once a divorce is filed, the court cannot grant any relief until the end of the case.

This is false: circuit courts can grant temporary relief while a divorce suit is pending. Once a divorce suit is filed in circuit court, either party may file a motion for “pendente lite” (pending final resolution) relief. Pursuant to Virginia Code § 20-103, the court may then enter a pendente lite order:

to compel a spouse to pay monies necessary for the maintenance and support of the petitioning … Read More »


How Does Divorce and Separation Affect Financial Aid for College Students?

Posted on July 30th, 2018, by Livesay & Myers, P.C. in Divorce, Family Law. Comments Off on How Does Divorce and Separation Affect Financial Aid for College Students?

Divorce between parents is common before a child reaches college age. How do divorce and separation affect a child’s eligibility for financial aid? The impact of a divorce or separation on financial aid eligibility is dictated primarily by which financial aid applications must be submitted to the student’s university. There are two major financial aid applications used by colleges. The first is the more widely used application called the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and the second is referred to as the CSS Profile (Profile), which is used by a small number of private colleges.

FAFSA

Generally, a student with divorced or separated parents will get a better financial aid package when filing a FAFSA because the FAFSA requires financial information only from the custodial parent, the parent who the student has lived with the most in the last 12 … Read More »


Changes to Virginia Spousal Support Law Effective July 1, 2018

Posted on May 17th, 2018, by Livesay & Myers, P.C. in Family Law. Comments Off on Changes to Virginia Spousal Support Law Effective July 1, 2018

The 2018 session of the Virginia General Assembly made some major changes to the Virginia Code that will affect the issue of the modification of spousal support in Virginia starting July 1, 2018.

Modification of Spousal Support When a Separation Agreement Is Silent About Modification

Until these recent changes in the law, it has been well settled in Virginia that if a separation agreement (frequently referred to as a “marital settlement agreement” or “property settlement agreement”) is silent as to whether an award of spousal support is modifiable due to a material change of circumstances, then the presumption by a court is that the award was fixed and could not be revisited or modified. As a result, some parties were signing agreements with the intent that they would have the ability to modify the spousal support award, but instead, would later discover that because the … Read More »


Sleuthing Blunders: Privacy Law Implications in Virginia Divorce and Custody Cases

Posted on February 27th, 2018, by Livesay & Myers, P.C. in Custody, Divorce, Family Law. Comments Off on Sleuthing Blunders: Privacy Law Implications in Virginia Divorce and Custody Cases

A contested divorce or custody battle is one of the most stressful and emotional times in a person’s life. If you suspect a cheating spouse or are concerned for the welfare of your children, you may go to any length to gather evidence to prove your suspicions. You may be tempted to break into your spouse’s emails or social media accounts, record their communications, or use surveillance to track their movements. However, it is best to seek legal advice and proceed with caution so that you do not unwittingly break the law, and expose yourself to criminal and financial consequences. Furthermore, evidence you obtain unlawfully may be excluded as evidence—making its gathering not worth the risk in many cases.

Intercepting Your Spouse’s Emails and Conversations

The Interception of Wire, Electronic or Oral Communications Act, found in Virginia Code § 19.2-61 through § 19.2-70.3, governs the legality of … Read More »


Defenses to Divorce in Virginia

Posted on January 24th, 2018, by Livesay & Myers, P.C. in Divorce, Family Law. Comments Off on Defenses to Divorce in Virginia

An action for divorce in Virginia commences with the filing of a complaint for divorce by one spouse (the plaintiff) against his or her spouse (the defendant) in the appropriate circuit court. Once the complaint and summons are served on the defendant, he/she has 21 days to answer the complaint. The defendant’s answer may consist of denials and admissions to the plaintiff’s allegations and may include the pleading of other facts—providing their side of the story. The defendant may raise any and all defenses to the plaintiff’s alleged ground for divorce and even file a counter-claim against the plaintiff seeking similar relief.

In Virginia, a divorce can be filed on fault-based or “no-fault” grounds. The fault-based grounds include adultery, cruelty and desertion. The no-fault ground is (1) separation for at least twelve months or (2) separation for at least six months, with a separation agreement … Read More »


Third-Party Custodians and Adoption in Virginia

Posted on July 10th, 2017, by Livesay & Myers, P.C. in Family Law. Comments Off on Third-Party Custodians and Adoption in Virginia

In Virginia, a grandparent, relative, or other interested party may seek and receive a court order granting them legal and physical custody of a child in their care. Such an order would give the custodian a feeling of security that the child cannot be taken from them unless a parent seeks to modify the custody order, in which case the custodian would presumably have an opportunity to object and have their day in court. However, under the Virginia Adoption Statute, that may well be a false sense of security. Under that act, parents who have lost custody nevertheless maintain their residual parental rights, including the right to consent to an adoption. The end result, as I will explain in detail below, is that third-party custodians with legal custody may actually lose the children in their care to an adoption without any notice or … Read More »


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Fairfax, VA 22030
703-865-4746
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Arlington, VA 22203
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113 E Market St #110
Leesburg, VA 20176
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Manassas, VA 20110
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