Category:Custody


Introduction of Children to a Paramour in Virginia

Posted on April 12th, 2021, by Jasmine Moore in Custody, Family Law. No Comments

Has your relationship recently ended or are you divorced with children? Are you dating and concerned about the introduction of your new loved one to your kids? Perhaps your estranged spouse or ex-spouse objects to the introduction and uses your newfound relationship to drag you back into a contentious court proceeding. Will a court prevent the introduction from occurring or minimize contact? Could you lose custody of your children because of the introduction? It all depends on the circumstances.

The introduction of a new partner to kids is absolutely relevant to custody and visitation determinations in Virginia courts. Custody and visitation decisions must be made with the children’s best interests in mind, pursuant to Virginia Code § 20-124.3. No two cases are exactly the same when it pertains to the introduction of a new partner to a child. There are a plethora … Read More »


Mental Health and Custody or Visitation Cases in Virginia

Posted on March 17th, 2021, by Jasmine Moore in Custody, Family Law. No Comments

Do you have a current mental health diagnosis? What about an ongoing custody or visitation case in Virginia? Are you worried about the impact that your diagnosis could have on your case? You are not alone.

The pandemic has affected people in many ways. Various stay-at-home orders and travel restrictions. The inability to share precious moments with loved ones, like the birth of a new child, college graduations and wedding ceremonies. Most people can agree that COVID-19 has also impacted their mental health. People without a mental health diagnosis prior to the pandemic are now being riddled with stress, anxiety and depression. Those who had mental health diagnoses may be seeing their conditions worsen. How will a mental health diagnosis impact a custody or visitation case in Virginia?

Under in Virginia Code § 20-124.3, judges are required to consider the mental health of each … Read More »


COVID-19, Co-Parenting and the Virtual Classroom

Posted on August 17th, 2020, by Livesay & Myers, P.C. in Custody, Family Law. No Comments

If asked six months ago, many parents could have recited their family’s weekday routine: children go to school, parents go to work, and family time is enjoyed at night—rinse and repeat. COVID-19 has forced parents to restructure that routine and navigate through unprecedented times structuring their family’s day. This can be especially challenging to those parents co-parenting with a not-so-cooperative parent, or for those parents in the midst of separation. The largest and most impactful variable of them all is the uncertainty surrounding the new school year, and the numerous options available to parents in many school districts. This poses many questions: who gets to decide what learning option is best for the children? If the children are distance learning, who is responsible for supervising that? What about the parent’s day job?

Who gets to decide what learning option is best … Read More »


Mediation of Virginia Family Law Cases During COVID-19

Posted on April 20th, 2020, by Jonathan McHugh in Custody, Divorce, Family Law. No Comments

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is raising special challenges for those facing separation, divorce, custody or support cases in Virginia. Couples who were experiencing marital difficulties before the crisis may find those difficulties magnified as they now spend much more time together at home. There are various custody and visitation issues raised by COVID-19, as well as issues of modification of support as many people are laid off from their jobs.

The Supreme Court of Virginia has issued an order temporarily limiting the types of cases that will be heard in Virginia. The order instructs Virginia courts to give precedence to certain emergency matters including emergency child custody cases, quarantine or isolation matters, and protective order cases. For more information, see Filing a New Family Law Case During the Judicial Emergency in Virginia.

The situation with COVID-19 does not mean that … Read More »


Filing a New Family Law Case During the Judicial Emergency in Virginia

Posted on April 15th, 2020, by Anneshia Miller Grant in Custody, Divorce, Family Law. No Comments

In response to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, on March 16, 2020 the Supreme Court of Virginia entered an order declaring a judicial emergency in Virginia. The initial judicial emergency order declared the judicial emergency through April 6, 2020, but the Supreme Court subsequently entered two additional judicial emergency orders, each time extending the emergency period by an additional 21 days. As of its most recent judicial emergency order, the Supreme Court has extended the judicial emergency period through May 17, 2020.

The judicial emergency order limits matters being heard in Virginia courts during this time—however, courts are not closed entirely. While courts are not operating at their normal capacity, judges are are still hearing cases. The order instructs Virginia courts to give precedence to certain emergency matters including emergency child custody cases, quarantine or isolation matters, and protective order cases.

The … Read More »


How Does COVID-19 Affect Your Virginia Custody and Visitation Order?

Posted on March 30th, 2020, by Anneshia Miller Grant in Custody, Family Law. No Comments

On March 12, 2020, Governor Northam declared a state of emergency in the Commonwealth of Virginia in response to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. In further response to the spread of the COVID-19, Virginia has implemented travel bans, limited public gatherings, closed schools for the remainder of the school year and implemented telework policies in an effort to keep as many Virginia residents in their homes as possible during this time.

On March 16, 2020, the Supreme Court of Virginia issued an order declaring a judicial emergency in Virginia through April 6, 2020. The Supreme Court subsequently entered two additional judicial emergency orders, each time extending the emergency period by an additional 21 days. As of its most recent judicial emergency order, the Supreme Court has extended the judicial emergency period through May 17, 2020.

The judicial emergency order limits matters being … Read More »


How to Testify at Your Family Law Trial in Virginia

Posted on March 25th, 2020, by Jamel Rowe in Custody, Divorce, Family Law. No Comments

For those facing a divorce, custody or support battle, one of the most nerve-wracking aspects of their case is the prospect of testifying at trial. Especially since for many people it is their first experience being in court.

You may be one of these anxious individuals. However, you should not allow trial scenes from Law & Order episodes to scare you, because there are a number of ways you can prepare for the uncertainty of trial.

First, you should familiarize yourself with the trial process and the courthouse. A trial usually proceeds as follows:

Opening statement of the Plaintiff.
Opening statement of the Defendant.
Plaintiff’s case-in-chief, during which they present evidence and witnesses through direct examination. The Defendant’s attorney can cross-examine these witnesses; however, their questions are limited to the scope of the direct examination. If direct examination addresses topic A only, the Defendant’s attorney … Read More »


Marriage Story: Four Lessons for Your Virginia Divorce

Posted on March 23rd, 2020, by Livesay & Myers, P.C. in Custody, Divorce, Family Law. No Comments

Marriage Story was released on Netflix in late 2019 to tremendous critical acclaim. The beautifully heartfelt film depicts the devastating unraveling of the marriage of two people, portrayed by Scarlett Johansson and Adam Driver. Marriage Story artfully captures the emotional turmoil faced by many people after they make the decision to pursue a divorce.

If you are a Virginia resident facing a divorce, not everything you see in Marriage Story will apply to your own case. The film gets some details right, but other things that happen in the film are legally questionable, or at least would not apply to a case in Virginia. But, we can identify four lessons from Marriage Story that you can apply to your Virginia divorce.

Interstate Custody Jurisdiction

One legal detail that Marriage Story seems to get wrong relates to interstate custody jurisdiction. The child custody battle in … Read More »


Can Courts Award Joint Legal Custody When The Parties Have a No Contact Protective Order in Place?

Posted on March 4th, 2020, by Maria Zamayar in Custody, Family Law. No Comments

You’re in a messy relationship with the other parent of your child—so messy that one of you has secured a no contact protective order against the other. How does that protective order affect the type of custody the court will award in your custody case? It might seem natural to assume that the court would refrain from awarding joint legal custody at a final custody hearing when the parties have a no contact protective order in place. After all, how would parents share the decision-making responsibilities of their child when they are prohibited from directly communicating with each other?

In most custody cases, courts are inclined to award joint legal custody because Virginia courts are statutorily mandated to assure frequent and continuing contact with both parents, when appropriate, and encourage parents to share in the responsibilities of rearing their children. Pursuant … Read More »


The Trend Towards Court-Ordered No-Cost Mediation

Posted on February 29th, 2020, by Livesay & Myers, P.C. in Custody, Divorce, Family Law. No Comments

Mediation has long been a popular alternative to drawn-out, costly and emotional contested litigation in Virginia family law cases. However, mediation has up until recently most often been an avenue that the parties themselves must proactively elect to participate in. This has generally required that (a) the attorneys involved in the case be proactive about discussing and promoting mediation with their clients, (b) both parties in the case be receptive to the discussion and open to a form of alternative dispute resolution that occurs outside a courtroom, and (c) a mutually agreed upon mediator be selected and a mediation date be set prior to the final trial date in the case.

Recently, however, some courts in Virginia have begun making mediation a mandatory part of the litigation process for some cases, with the goal that the parties will be able to … Read More »


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