Category:Divorce


Can You Date While Separated in Virginia?

Posted on March 18th, 2019, by Christopher Doyle in Divorce, Family Law. No Comments

Now that you are separated from your spouse, you may be asking yourself: “I want to move on with my life and meet new people. Can I reenter the dating world? What happens if I become romantically involved with someone?” Unfortunately, under Virginia law there are no simple answers to these questions. For those who are currently separated and either dating or are thinking about dating, there are several factors to consider.

First, unlike some states, there is no such thing as a “legal separation” in Virginia. Under Virginia law, you are either married or divorced, so even though you may be separated from your spouse physically, you are still married in the eyes of the law. With that being said, no one can prevent you from dating during your separation. It is not a crime to do so, and … Read More »


The Treatment of Inherited Property in Virginia Divorce Cases

Posted on January 15th, 2019, by Christopher Doyle in Divorce, Family Law. No Comments

Going through a divorce can be a time of uncertainty, and you probably have many questions about the process. While there are many issues that arise during a divorce, one of the main concerns you might have is how your property is going to be divided. You may be wondering what is going to happen to the marital home, bank accounts, retirement accounts and pensions, personal property, and debts. How will the court divide everything?

These questions are only compounded when one of the parties has received an inheritance. What about that money your grandparents left for you in their will when they passed away years ago? Or how about the summer vacation home that has been in your spouse’s family for years? Is a person entitled to part of their spouse’s inheritance, even though it was meant as a gift … Read More »


How Does Divorce and Separation Affect Financial Aid for College Students?

Posted on July 30th, 2018, by Alisa Chunephisal in Divorce, Family Law. No Comments

Divorce between parents is common before a child reaches college age. How do divorce and separation affect a child’s eligibility for financial aid? The impact of a divorce or separation on financial aid eligibility is dictated primarily by which financial aid applications must be submitted to the student’s university. There are two major financial aid applications used by colleges. The first is the more widely used application called the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and the second is referred to as the CSS Profile (Profile), which is used by a small number of private colleges.

FAFSA

Generally, a student with divorced or separated parents will get a better financial aid package when filing a FAFSA because the FAFSA requires financial information only from the custodial parent, the parent who the student has lived with the most in the last 12 … Read More »


Sleuthing Blunders: Privacy Law Implications in Virginia Divorce and Custody Cases

Posted on February 27th, 2018, by Anne Prentice in Custody, Divorce, Family Law. No Comments

A contested divorce or custody battle is one of the most stressful and emotional times in a person’s life. If you suspect a cheating spouse or are concerned for the welfare of your children, you may go to any length to gather evidence to prove your suspicions. You may be tempted to break into your spouse’s emails or social media accounts, record their communications, or use surveillance to track their movements. However, it is best to seek legal advice and proceed with caution so that you do not unwittingly break the law, and expose yourself to criminal and financial consequences. Furthermore, evidence you obtain unlawfully may be excluded as evidence—making its gathering not worth the risk in many cases.

Intercepting Your Spouse’s Emails and Conversations

The Interception of Wire, Electronic or Oral Communications Act, found in Virginia Code § 19.2-61 through § 19.2-70.3, governs the legality of … Read More »


Division of Retirement Accounts in a Virginia Divorce

Posted on February 26th, 2018, by Brianna Salerno in Divorce, Family Law. No Comments

Virginia is an “equitable distribution state,” which means that in any divorce proceeding, a circuit court is permitted to classify parties’ properties and debts as either separate property, marital property, or a hybrid property (consisting of both separate property and marital property funds). Once the circuit court classifies the parties’ properties and debts, then the court is authorized under Virginia law to divide these assets and debts accordingly.

One such type of marital asset that a Virginia circuit court will divide is any retirement accounts titled in either party’s name. In Virginia, the division of a retirement account shall not exceed fifty percent (50%) of the marital share. Under Virginia law, the marital share is is defined as the portion of the total interest that was earned during the marriage until the parties’ date of separation.

What Types of Retirement Accounts are … Read More »


Student Loan Debt in Virginia Divorce Cases

Posted on February 12th, 2018, by Shirin Afsous in Divorce, Family Law. No Comments

The financial consequences of divorce may have lasting effects on a party’s monetary stability for years following the conclusion of the case. Virginia is an equitable distribution jurisdiction, meaning that in any divorce proceeding, the circuit court has the authority to classify the property of the parties as separate, marital or hybrid. The court then uses this designation when distributing the debts and property of the parties. Pursuant to Virginia’s equitable distribution statute, Virginia Code § 20-107.3, the court must consider all debts and property belonging to the parties, which includes all real, personal, tangible and intangible property.

While Virginia’s equitable distribution statute is intended to create a fair system for the division of property and debt, it may have unintended results for parties involved in a divorce who either entered the marriage with student loan debt or acquired student loan debt … Read More »


Incorporation and Merger of Your Separation Agreement

Posted on January 29th, 2018, by Ariel Baniowski in Divorce, Family Law. Comments Off on Incorporation and Merger of Your Separation Agreement

In many Virginia divorce cases, the parties resolve outstanding issues between them by use of a separation agreement, also frequently referred to as a “marital settlement agreement” or “property settlement agreement.” Often, parties are advised by their counsel that such an agreement will be “incorporated” into their final order of divorce, and most parties don’t even bother to question that advice, and even more are not even aware that the court has broad discretion to incorporate all, some or none of the provisions of their separation agreement.

So, what does it mean to incorporate an agreement (in whole or in part) into a final order of divorce, and what happens if the court does not incorporate the agreement into its final order of divorce?

Contract vs. Court Order

To begin answering those questions, let’s step back and ask: what is the difference between a private contract and … Read More »


Defenses to Divorce in Virginia

Posted on January 24th, 2018, by Livesay & Myers, P.C. in Divorce, Family Law. Comments Off on Defenses to Divorce in Virginia

An action for divorce in Virginia commences with the filing of a complaint for divorce by one spouse (the plaintiff) against his or her spouse (the defendant) in the appropriate circuit court. Once the complaint and summons are served on the defendant, he/she has 21 days to answer the complaint. The defendant’s answer may consist of denials and admissions to the plaintiff’s allegations and may include the pleading of other facts—providing their side of the story. The defendant may raise any and all defenses to the plaintiff’s alleged ground for divorce and even file a counter-claim against the plaintiff seeking similar relief.

In Virginia, a divorce can be filed on fault-based or “no-fault” grounds. The fault-based grounds include adultery, cruelty and desertion. The no-fault ground is (1) separation for at least twelve months or (2) separation for at least six months, with a separation agreement … Read More »


Three Tips for Keeping Costs Down in Your Divorce

Posted on November 13th, 2017, by Melannie Dino in Divorce, Family Law. Comments Off on Three Tips for Keeping Costs Down in Your Divorce

Contested divorce cases can be extremely costly. The costs are often driven up by an aggressive opposing party or counsel, or through multiple actions being heard at the same time, sometimes even in different courts. If you find yourself in such a situation, you may not be able to completely prevent costs from rising. However, there are some steps you can take to help keep your attorney’s fees as low as possible. Here are three tips for keeping costs down in your divorce:

Consolidate communications with your attorney. Communication between you and your attorney will be essential in your divorce. However, in many cases a client will both telephone and email their attorney several times in the course of a day. Costs can add up quickly if you do not do your part to make each communication efficient and meaningful. If time permits, … Read More »


Which Court Should You File In?

Posted on June 26th, 2017, by Livesay & Myers, P.C. in Custody, Divorce, Family Law. Comments Off on Which Court Should You File In?

Many family law clients ask the same question during their initial consultation: “which court should I file in?” In Virginia, both the juvenile and domestic relations district court (“J&DR court”) and the circuit court handle family law cases. The J&DR court has the power to hear matters concerning custody, visitation, child support, and spousal support. The circuit court can hear all of the same issues, in addition to divorce and equitable distribution.

Unmarried couples with children must file in the J&DR court for custody, visitation, and child support to be determined. For couples who are divorcing, there are factual, procedural, and strategic considerations that come into play when determining which court to start in. Generally speaking, if one of the parties has grounds for a divorce, it may make more sense to begin the matter in circuit court, but this is … Read More »


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