The Livesay & Myers, P.C. Blog


Changes to Military Retirement System in 2019

Posted on January 17th, 2019, by Anneshia Miller Grant in Family Law, Military Divorce. No Comments

On January 1, 2019, big changes went into effect for the military retirement system for active duty and retiring servicemembers. The legacy system in place prior to January 1st provides military servicemembers with 20 or more years of service with a monthly annuity, based on years of service, upon retirement.* In addition to the annuity, servicemembers have been able to contribute to the Thrift Savings Plan (TSP), the equivalent to a military 401k account, as an additional means of saving for retirement.

The new retirement plan, called the Blended Retirement System (BRS), blends these two options for new servicemembers and for servicemembers with less than 12 years of service who opt in to the new plan. The BRS maintains the annuity based on years of service, but now the Department of Defense (DoD) will also automatically contribute 1% to the servicemembers … Read More »


The Treatment of Inherited Property in Virginia Divorce Cases

Posted on January 15th, 2019, by Christopher Doyle in Divorce, Family Law. No Comments

Going through a divorce can be a time of uncertainty, and you probably have many questions about the process. While there are many issues that arise during a divorce, one of the main concerns you might have is how your property is going to be divided. You may be wondering what is going to happen to the marital home, bank accounts, retirement accounts and pensions, personal property, and debts. How will the court divide everything?

These questions are only compounded when one of the parties has received an inheritance. What about that money your grandparents left for you in their will when they passed away years ago? Or how about the summer vacation home that has been in your spouse’s family for years? Is a person entitled to part of their spouse’s inheritance, even though it was meant as a gift … Read More »


Terms to Include in Consent Custody and Visitation Orders

Posted on January 7th, 2019, by Brandi Howell in Custody, Family Law. No Comments

When parents decide to split up, the first thought to enter their minds is often “What is going to happen to the children?” In many cases, one or both parties will file Petitions for Custody and Visitation to protect the interests of their minor children. Depending on which court the petitions are filed in, the parties may not obtain a resolution to their custody and visitation dispute for several months, or in some cases a year or more.

Due to the number of family law cases being filed these days, courts are encouraging parties to mediate their claims and/or enter into “consent orders.” A Consent Custody and Visitation Order is a court order wherein the parties agree on the terms relating to custody and visitation of the minor children. Although some parties just cannot agree on custody and insist on litigating … Read More »


Livesay & Myers, P.C. Listed in 2019 Edition of U.S. News – Best Lawyers® “Best Law Firms”

Posted on November 1st, 2018, by James Livesay in Uncategorized. No Comments

We are proud to announce that Livesay & Myers, P.C. appears in the 2019 Edition of the U.S. News & World Report listing of Best Law Firms, released on November 1, 2018!

The 2019 Edition edition marks the ninth consecutive year that U.S. News & World Report, in combination with Best Lawyers, has ranked law firms nationwide. Livesay & Myers, P.C. made its debut on the list in the 2018 Edition.

Firms included in the 2019 Edition of Best Law Firms are recognized for professional excellence with consistently impressive ratings from clients and peers. Achieving a tiered ranking signals a unique combination of quality law practice and breadth of legal expertise.

Livesay & Myers, P.C. is ranked for the second consecutive year as a Tier 2 firm in Family Law for the Washington, D.C. region. And, also for the second consecutive year, L&M … Read More »


Common Myths of Family Law in Virginia

Posted on August 12th, 2018, by Brandi Howell in Family Law. No Comments

Family law encompasses many issues affecting families, including but not limited to divorce, child custody and visitation, child and spousal support, protective orders, pre/post-nuptial agreements and equitable distribution. With so much information on the internet, it may be difficult to get accurate answers about certain issues. Below, we debunk four common myths of family law in Virginia.

Myth #1: once a divorce is filed, the court cannot grant any relief until the end of the case.

This is false: circuit courts can grant temporary relief while a divorce suit is pending. Once a divorce suit is filed in circuit court, either party may file a motion for “pendente lite” (pending final resolution) relief. Pursuant to Virginia Code § 20-103, the court may then enter a pendente lite order:

to compel a spouse to pay monies necessary for the maintenance and support of the petitioning … Read More »


How Does Divorce and Separation Affect Financial Aid for College Students?

Posted on July 30th, 2018, by Alisa Chunephisal in Divorce, Family Law. No Comments

Divorce between parents is common before a child reaches college age. How do divorce and separation affect a child’s eligibility for financial aid? The impact of a divorce or separation on financial aid eligibility is dictated primarily by which financial aid applications must be submitted to the student’s university. There are two major financial aid applications used by colleges. The first is the more widely used application called the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and the second is referred to as the CSS Profile (Profile), which is used by a small number of private colleges.

FAFSA

Generally, a student with divorced or separated parents will get a better financial aid package when filing a FAFSA because the FAFSA requires financial information only from the custodial parent, the parent who the student has lived with the most in the last 12 … Read More »


Changes to Virginia Spousal Support Law Effective July 1, 2018

Posted on May 17th, 2018, by Alisa Chunephisal in Family Law. No Comments

The 2018 session of the Virginia General Assembly made some major changes to the Virginia Code that will affect the issue of the modification of spousal support in Virginia starting July 1, 2018.

Modification of Spousal Support When a Separation Agreement Is Silent About Modification

Until these recent changes in the law, it has been well settled in Virginia that if a separation agreement (frequently referred to as a “marital settlement agreement” or “property settlement agreement”) is silent as to whether an award of spousal support is modifiable due to a material change of circumstances, then the presumption by a court is that the award was fixed and could not be revisited or modified. As a result, some parties were signing agreements with the intent that they would have the ability to modify the spousal support award, but instead, would later discover that because the … Read More »


Sleuthing Blunders: Privacy Law Implications in Virginia Divorce and Custody Cases

Posted on February 27th, 2018, by Anne Prentice in Custody, Divorce, Family Law. No Comments

A contested divorce or custody battle is one of the most stressful and emotional times in a person’s life. If you suspect a cheating spouse or are concerned for the welfare of your children, you may go to any length to gather evidence to prove your suspicions. You may be tempted to break into your spouse’s emails or social media accounts, record their communications, or use surveillance to track their movements. However, it is best to seek legal advice and proceed with caution so that you do not unwittingly break the law, and expose yourself to criminal and financial consequences. Furthermore, evidence you obtain unlawfully may be excluded as evidence—making its gathering not worth the risk in many cases.

Intercepting Your Spouse’s Emails and Conversations

The Interception of Wire, Electronic or Oral Communications Act, found in Virginia Code § 19.2-61 through § 19.2-70.3, governs the legality of … Read More »


Division of Retirement Accounts in a Virginia Divorce

Posted on February 26th, 2018, by Brianna Salerno in Divorce, Family Law. No Comments

Virginia is an “equitable distribution state,” which means that in any divorce proceeding, a circuit court is permitted to classify parties’ properties and debts as either separate property, marital property, or a hybrid property (consisting of both separate property and marital property funds). Once the circuit court classifies the parties’ properties and debts, then the court is authorized under Virginia law to divide these assets and debts accordingly.

One such type of marital asset that a Virginia circuit court will divide is any retirement accounts titled in either party’s name. In Virginia, the division of a retirement account shall not exceed fifty percent (50%) of the marital share. Under Virginia law, the marital share is is defined as the portion of the total interest that was earned during the marriage until the parties’ date of separation.

What Types of Retirement Accounts are … Read More »


Filing for Child Support When Parent’s Location Is Unknown

Posted on February 15th, 2018, by Sarah Patras in Family Law. No Comments

When you petition the court for child support, one of the things the court asks for is the address of both parents. So, what do you do if you don’t know where the other parent is? A parent is not relieved of his or her parental responsibilities merely because he or she can’t be located. However, not knowing the parent’s location may make it difficult for the court to enter an order, and even more difficult for the court to enforce an order.

For every child support case in Virginia, the court is required to serve the opposing party with notice of the petition for support and a summons for the date of the hearing. For a cost, a private investigator can be used to find the most recent addresses for the opposing party. Then, you can list the most reliable … Read More »




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