The Livesay & Myers, P.C. Blog


The Basics of Paternity in Virginia

Posted on May 28th, 2015, by Ariel Baniowski in Custody, Family Law. No Comments

Paternity is a father’s assumption of legal rights and responsibilities to a child. An established legal father of a child has a duty and obligation to support that child, as well as the right to petition the court for custody or visitation of the child. Such rights and responsibilities do not apply and cannot be exercised unless and until paternity is established.

In addition to the emotional and quality of life benefits that building the father-child relationship can have for both parties, establishing paternity also entitles the child to other possible benefits, including the right to inherit, the right to share in social security, the right to collect disability and veteran’s benefits if applicable, and the right to receive insurance and medical health benefits. Establishment of paternity is also valuable to the child because knowing the mental and physical health history of … Read More »


Virginia Court of Appeals: Same-Sex Couples Can Not Cohabit

Posted on May 21st, 2015, by Anneshia Miller Grant in Family Law. No Comments

In an unpublished opinion issued on April 21, 2015, the Virginia Court of Appeals upheld the ruling of a trial court that same-sex couples cannot cohabit under Virginia law. The case, Lutrell v. Cucco, might prove to be very important in the evolution of the law regarding same-sex relationships in Virginia.

In Lutrell v. Cucco, Mr. Lutrell (represented by Livesay & Myers, P.C.) filed a motion to terminate his $2,450 per month spousal support payment to his ex-wife Ms. Cucco based upon her cohabitation with another person for more than a year, pursuant to Virginia Code §20-109. That code section states in relevant part that:

[u]pon order of the court based upon clear and convincing evidence that the spouse receiving support has been habitually cohabiting with another person in a relationship analogous to a marriage for one year or more commencing … Read More »


Four Advantages of the Mediation Process

Posted on May 19th, 2015, by Matthew Smith in Divorce, Family Law. No Comments

So you’re open to reaching a fair divorce settlement with your spouse, but you don’t have confidence that the two of you (with or without your attorneys) can make lasting progress around a conference table. In that setting, emotions may run too high or your spouse may fixate on certain elements of your case that cloud and crowd out everything else.

Maybe there has been infidelity, domestic violence, abandonment or simply a failure to communicate without every interaction devolving into a shouting match. These are all-too-common elements in contested family law cases. You may need a neutral third party with authority to step in and help drag your case across the finish line.

Whether your mediator is a retired judge or family law practitioner, he or she will likely be knowledgeable and experienced in family law and skilled in the art of … Read More »


Idaho Jeopardizes U.S. Participation in Hague Convention

Posted on May 19th, 2015, by Benjamin Carafiol in Family Law. No Comments

Concerns Over Shariah Law Threaten International Child Support Treaty

A few years ago, we covered federal action on the 2007 Hague Convention on the International Recovery of Child Support and Other Forms of Family Maintenance. Specifically, I wrote about how the U.S. House of Representatives unanimously passed key language implementing the Hague Convention in the International Child Support Recovery Act of 2012. While that bill did not ultimately become law, a new issue has recently arisen that jeopardizes U.S. participation in the Hague Convention itself.

As the 2015 session of the Idaho legislature approached closing, the Judiciary, Rules and Administration Committee of the Idaho House of Representatives voted to kill an update to Idaho’s version of the Uniform Interstate Family Support Act. The update would have brought child support enforcement methods in Idaho into alignment with the terms of the Hague Convention. The measure had passed the … Read More »


Child Support for Third-Party Custodians in Virginia

Posted on May 15th, 2015, by Stephanie Sauer in Custody, Family Law. No Comments

Children are expensive; there is no doubt about it. When a third party steps up and receives custody of a minor child, that custodian has new, often times unplanned for, expenses. Many times custodians want financial support from the parents but do not know where to begin. Do they file against one parent? Both parents? Will the custodian’s income be a factor? The questions can be endless and the process can feel overwhelming.

Assuming all parties (parent(s) and custodian) reside in Virginia, a third party custodian can seek child support through the court in Virginia as follows:

First, the custodian would file a separate child support petition against each parent, and request that the court docket the two petitions together.

Second, once the matter is docketed, the parents would provide and exchange their income information, and the court or counsel would proceed to calculate … Read More »


Citizenship Through Parents

Posted on May 13th, 2015, by Susannah Nichols in Immigration Law. No Comments

Are you a citizen of the United States? This may seem like a basic question, but for some the answer may be complicated. Many people may be U.S. citizens without even knowing it, particularly where their citizenship is derived through the naturalization of their parents. The distinction can be significant, particularly where that person finds themselves facing criminal charges. Below I outline the ways in which a person might have become a U.S. citizen as a child through no action of their own.

U.S. Citizen at Time of Birth

Birth in the United States or certain U.S. territories. This is how most of us derived our citizenship and while this route is quite well known, some confusion persists. For example, Supreme Court Justice Sotomayor, whose parents moved to New York from Puerto Rico before she was born, is often incorrectly labeled as … Read More »


When Is It Legal to Leave a Child Home Alone in Virginia?

Posted on May 5th, 2015, by Pia Miller in Custody, Family Law. No Comments

At what age is it legal to leave a child home alone in Virginia?

It may come as a surprise that there is not a Virginia law that answers this exact question. There is no specific age at which you can legally leave your child at home alone unattended. However, there is guidance set forth from the Virginia Department of Social Services that parents should consider when making this determination:

Your child’s maturity level. You know your child better than anyone else does. Is your child physically and mentally capable of taking care of themselves? Think of it this way: when you give your child a specific instruction, are they able to follow it without any additional assistance?
How easily can your child reach you? It is not simply enough that an adult neighbor is available next door: you, as the parent and legal guardian, must be … Read More »


The Dependency Exemption and ObamaCare

Posted on May 4th, 2015, by Danielle Snead in Family Law. No Comments

As most parents know, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) allows parents of dependent children to claim a percentage of their income as exempt from taxes. Separated or divorce parents will usually both want this exemption for themselves, as it can be quite valuable (the exemption was $3,950 per child in 2014). As a child can only be claimed on one tax return per year, a common question in child support cases is who will get the tax dependency exemption each year for each minor child.

According to IRS regulations, the custodial parent is the party entitled to claim the tax exemption for each child. A custodial parent for these purposes is the parent with whom the child resides more than half the time. If the parents have 50/50 custody of a child, resulting in neither party being the “custodial parent,” then the parent … Read More »


Immigration Law Updates for May 2015

Posted on April 30th, 2015, by Jennifer Varughese in Immigration Law. No Comments

Immigration law continues to be a hotbed of legal and political activity in the United States. As we enter May 2015, here are updates on three important areas of immigration law:

Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA)

In November 2014, President Obama announced a new plan for executive action on immigration, which included Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA). As explained in my earlier blog post, DAPA permits immigrants who have sons or daughters who are U.S. citizens or lawful permanent residents to not only remain in the U.S. but receive work permits as well. The President’s executive action immediately came under scrutiny. On February 16, 2015, a judge in Texas issued a nationwide injunction to stop implementation of DAPA. On April 17, 2015, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit … Read More »


How to Move Your Stalled Divorce Case Along

Posted on April 13th, 2015, by Jonathan McHugh in Family Law. No Comments

Divorce cases come with any number of possible frustrations, for the parties and the attorneys alike. One of the biggest frustrations for clients (and attorneys) is the length of time it takes to move their case towards a final resolution, through a comprehensive settlement or final hearing. Whether you are just now considering a divorce, or are already in the middle of a stalled divorce proceeding, here are four tips for moving your divorce along:

Know Your Attorney: The initial consultation with your attorney, as well as follow up conversations and meetings, should give you an idea of your attorney’s personality and overall strategy for your case. Some attorneys are settlement-oriented, while some will think it’s best to litigate every issue that comes up. You should make sure that you have a clear understanding of the strategy your attorney has for your … Read More »




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