About Jennifer Varughese

Jennifer S. Varughese is the lead immigration attorney at Livesay & Myers, P.C. Her immigration law practice covers both family-based and employment-based green cards, temporary visas, adjustment of status for those already present in the country, citizenship, and deportation cases. Ms. Varughese has been recognized for her work in the area of the immigration consequences of criminal convictions.

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Here are the most recent posts by this author:


Green Cards Through the Immigration Registry

Posted on July 21st, 2014, by Jennifer Varughese in Immigration Law. No Comments

I recently handled the immigration case of an individual who has resided in the U.S. since the late 1950s. Having entered on a farmworker visa and then falling out of status once the visa expired, my client filed for a green card based on a little-known program in the U.S. called Registry. Quite simply, Registry allows for a person to obtain a green card (or permanent residency) if they can prove physical and continuous presence in the U.S. since January 1, 1972.

Other criteria for a green card through the Registry include that the individual is:

a person of good moral character;
not ineligible for citizenship; and
not deportable as a terrorist or inadmissible for engaging in Nazi persecution, genocide, torturous acts, or extrajudicial killings.

Importantly, the applicant must have proof of his/her continuous physical presence in the U.S. since 1972. Such proof includes: bills, … Read More »


Criminal Convictions and Fiance Visas

Posted on May 27th, 2014, by Jennifer Varughese in Immigration Law. No Comments

In 2006, the federal Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act (AWA) was signed into law. Among its more well-known features, the AWA revised requirements for sex offender registration. Lesser known, however, is the significant detrimental effect the AWA can have on U.S. citizens who seek to sponsor loved ones for fiancé/fiancée visas or other U.S. immigration benefits.

Perhaps it’s best to start with an example. Jack, a U.S. citizen, and Jill, a citizen of a foreign country, meet and fall in love. Jack and Jill get married. Jill needs a green card to either enter or remain in the U.S., so Jack files the requisite paperwork on her behalf. While their application is pending, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) issues a Notice of Intent to Deny letter, threatening to deny Jack’s petition based on an incident from his past … Read More »


The Affidavit of Support in Immigration Law

Posted on April 1st, 2014, by Jennifer Varughese in Immigration Law. No Comments

The Affidavit of Support is an immigration law document that places special obligations on an immigrant’s sponsor. It is very important that both those signing the document (i.e., U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents) and the sponsored immigrants understand exactly what an Affidavit of Support is, and what it means. It is also important that family law attorneys, who may see such documents in divorce proceedings, have a general understanding of the Affidavit of Support.

To aid in the understanding of sponsors, immigrants, and family law attorneys, here are answers to five frequently asked questions about the all-important Affidavit of Support:

What is an Affidavit of Support? The Affidavit of Support is a document an individual signs to accept financial responsibility for another person, usually a relative, who is coming to the United States to live permanently. Make no mistake, the Affidavit … Read More »


Immigration Court Delays: When Will Your Case Be Heard?

Posted on February 26th, 2014, by Jennifer Varughese in Immigration Law. No Comments

Proceedings in present day immigration court present a very stark contrast. Many cases now drag on for many months or even years before being heard. But when an immigrant’s day in court finally arrives, overcrowded court dockets often leave the judge with only a few minutes to decide the fate of the immigrant and their family.

If you or a loved one are currently going through deportation (now known as removal) proceedings in immigration court, and have filed an application for relief, you are likely aware of the sometimes extraordinary length of time it takes to resolve a case. Lengthy delays for a trial (known as an Individual Hearing) are commonplace in many of the 50+ immigration courts located in 29 states.

Our local court in Arlington, Virginia currently has five immigration judges (often referred to as IJs), after losing one to retirement earlier in the year. Perhaps … Read More »


Justin Bieber Faces Deportation

Posted on January 29th, 2014, by Jennifer Varughese in Immigration Law. No Comments

Reports of pop star Justin Bieber’s recent run-ins with the law have dominated the news. Certainly, many young stars in the throes of fame find themselves in similar situations. What adds an extra wrinkle to Bieber’s situation, however, is the fact that, as a Canadian citizen, criminal activity can jeopardize his U.S. immigration status.

Bieber currently holds an O-1 visa. O-1 visas are given to those individuals who demonstrate “extraordinary ability” in the sciences, education, athletics, or the arts. Such ability in the arts means that the individual is renowned, leading, or well-known in their field of creative endeavor. Examples of O-1 visa holders include: NBA star Dirk Nowitzki, Israeli concert pianist Inon Barnatan, and Canadian author Jennifer Gould Keil. The O-1 visa holder is given an initial stay of up to three years, followed by extensions for one-year increments.

Bieber now faces a litany of criminal charges, including: … Read More »


Open House For Free Immigration Consults on January 30, 2014

Posted on January 7th, 2014, by Jennifer Varughese in Immigration Law. No Comments

The new year is a great opportunity to discuss your immigration questions with seasoned professionals. Immigration law is complex, changing in content from year to year and in practice from one federal agency to the next. From extreme hardship waivers to parole in place for military members, green cards for spouses to expedited citizenship, any case benefits from strong counsel.

On Thursday, January 30, 2014, the immigration department at Livesay & Myers, P.C. will be hosting its first Open House of the year. Free, 30-minute consultations will be given between the hours of 9:00–5:00 p.m. at our Fairfax office located at 3975 University Drive, Suite 325, Fairfax, VA 22030. Though walk-in appointments will be accommodated on a case-by-case basis, interested individuals are strongly encouraged to schedule an appointment in advance by calling (703) 865-4746.


Federal Government Shutdown Impacts Immigration System

Posted on October 2nd, 2013, by Jennifer Varughese in Immigration Law. No Comments

Whether it lasts for a few days or several weeks, the federal government shutdown is already having an immediate impact on the U.S. immigration system. Here is a summary of the most recent updates from various immigration agencies and departments:

Department of Homeland Security.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) – detention and enforcement will continue.

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) – all offices are open, so green card, naturalization, asylum, and all other interviews will continue as scheduled.

Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR – Immigration Courts). Locally, the Arlington and Baltimore immigration courts are open but operations are limited. At this time, the courts are only hearing cases of individuals who have been detained.

Department of State. Embassies and consulates worldwide will continue to operate until their operating funds are depleted. This could result in … Read More »


L-1 Visa Denials By USCIS Are On The Rise

Posted on August 16th, 2013, by Jennifer Varughese in Immigration Law. No Comments

After learning of an increase in L-1 visa denials at this summer’s annual AILA Conference, our office began to see just how extensive these denials have become. As a reminder, an L-1 visa can be used by a U.S. company to bring foreign workers from an overseas branch, parent company, subsidiary, or affiliate. L-1 visas are divided into two categories: 1) L-1A Intracompany Transferee Executive or Manager and 2) L-1B Intracompany Transferee Specialized Knowledge. A brief summary of both types is provided below as well as some of the current issues with L-1B visas, in particular.

L-1A Visa – General Description

This visa allows a U.S. employer to transfer an executive or manager from an affiliated foreign office to work in the U.S. It can also be used by a foreign company to send an executive or manager to the U.S. to … Read More »


Highlights From 2013 AILA National Conference

Posted on July 17th, 2013, by Jennifer Varughese in Immigration Law. No Comments

Recently, I attended the 2013 AILA (American Immigration Lawyers Association) national conference in San Francisco. This conference brings together some of the best and brightest immigration practitioners nationwide. After attending numerous sessions, I gained new insight into a variety of topics. Below are some of the main highlights:

Nonimmigrants who are accustomed to receiving paper I-94 cards upon entry into the United States may be pleased to hear that Customs now issues paperless I-94s to those traveling by air or sea. The foreign national will be able to print a computer-generated copy of the paperless I-94 online here. It is a good idea to review the computer version for accuracy and then print and staple the I-94 into a passport.
During the Conference, on June 26th, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act, also known as … Read More »


The Case Of Edward Snowden: Asylum For An American Abroad?

Posted on June 15th, 2013, by Jennifer Varughese in Immigration Law. No Comments

I thought I’d take this opportunity to depart from my usual blogs on U.S. immigration law and procedure to showcase how immigration law works on the international stage. By now, many of you have heard of the former CIA official, Edward Snowden, who is facing a world of trouble for revealing a secret surveillance program run by the U.S. government. Lauded by some as a hero and denounced by others as a traitor, Snowden, a U.S. citizen, is now trying to do something that may sound peculiar at first – seek asylum in another country. Each year, scores of individuals come to the United States seeking asylum based on meeting a standard of past or potential future persecution because of their race, religion, nationality, political opinion, or membership in a particular social group. Is it possible, however, that the U.S. … Read More »


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